Design & Technology

Students’ Social Moral Spiritual & Cultural is developed in Design & Technology in a number of ways. We believe that in educating our students to think about the impact of their designing and making on the environment and people. Sustainability and the clear understanding of how this is applied to designing new products are paramount if we are to protect the world’s natural resources. Students are also expected to grow and develop a sense of social responsibility, mutual respect and care for each other through our teaching of behaviour self-regulation. We expect students to influence the behaviour of others around them by encouraging a confidence to challenge each other when standards fall below our collective expectations.

Mutual respect is engendered through the process of peer evaluation of each other’s work and standards. We empower students to take criticism positively and to articulate their views in a respectful and sensitive way. We support this through the celebration of human fallibility as a motivator to learn and succeed.

We support students search for Meaning and Purpose through encouraging creativity in projects and challenge them with the fundamental question, how will my designing benefit humanity? Students draw upon a variety of sources for inspiration. Many of these are natural but true creativity comes from the freedom to explore within more open ended projects

Equal Opportunities: Is taught through collaborative and team learning. Valuing contributions and celebrating these as well as outcomes. We try to instil in students that the journey is more important than the outcome because that is where true understanding is gained.

Spiritual development is of a very high importance in design & technology. The process of creative thinking and innovation inspires students to bring out undiscovered talents, which in turn breeds a self-confidence and belief in their abilities. It also challenges and appeals to the creative instincts that have driven humanity to discover, adapt and overcome. Within our schemes of work we seek to develop these.

In year 11 the major design & make project engages students. Students learn to be resilient and have to manage a range of emotions throughout the project. Students learn a lot about their own character and develop key attributes needed to see a long project through. The sense of pride in the journey they have taken at the end of the project is evident.

In Design & Technology we seek to develop a sense of ‘moral conscience’ in our students, through focusing upon the moral dilemmas raised in designing and making new products. We teach students to understand the wider impacts on the environment when designing and making new products and expect them to consider carefully the materials & components they will use when designing and making. We encourage sustainable thinking through the active application of the ‘6 R’s’ and to highlight the impact on environmentally sensitive areas of the world.

During the major project students have to consider the use of CAD/CAM in designing and making products and the benefits and impact of CAD/CAM on skills and traditional craftsmen can they co-exist?

We develop wider cultural awareness in design 7 technology through projects that have a connection with our past heritage and how our industrial routes have shaped our nation. We seek to expand student’s knowledge of other cultures influences on design and manufacture including an increasing awareness of the influences digital manufacturing developments from other countries is having on the designing and making of products that we use.

Students look at cultural influences on the food we cook and the diversity of ingredients available for us to cook with. They also learn about staple foods of other countries.


The Technology department is a modern forward looking subject, which aims to motivate, enthuse and inspire our students to incorporate a wider range of ideas and concepts within their work by utilising up-to-date technologies to solve the design problems of today, as well as to engineer, design and create the designed world we will live in tomorrow.

The progression of technology over the past 50 years is clearly set to continue doing so. From developing materials that can be mass produced into complex shapes, to designing a more sustainable way of living, all of our lives are intricately affected by the vision, innovation and skills of designers, architects and engineers.

It is with this in mind that we promote design an intelligent activity, which involves considering a wide range of external factors, such as existing designs and designers, aesthetics, ergonomics, sustainability, costs, health and safety, materials, processes, structural integrity and consumer demand.

The work our students produce comes in many guises and the ability to draw upon areas such as Maths, Science and ICT as well as Art play a crucial role.

Key Stage 3

Design Technology and Food  is taught to all students in year 7 and 8.

Our KS3 curriculum is aimed to motivate, enthuse and inspire our students. We endeavor to   give opportunities to students that will allow them to see the changes to the world around them, allowing them think about solving problems and creating meaningful solutions. We like to mix in-depth theory and practical experiences where making  skills will be developed to give students the opportunities to broaden their learning and that of others.

Key Stage 4

In KS4 we give the students a choice of subject areas including Graphics, Engineering, Catering, Business Studies, Psychology, Health and Social Care as well as Hair and Beauty.

GCSE students will have the opportunity to work with a range of materials in a variety of design and make projects in preparation for their main GCSE project.

Students use computer aided design and manufacture as appropriate and we mix modern materials and manufacturing techniques to more traditional ones in order to maximise the potential of every student.

The Enterprise Faculty aims to inspire and empower students to become active participants in designing their own future by giving them the opportunity to learn through both theoretical understanding and experience.

More Able (formerly Gifted & Talented)

The department has clear and wide-ranging criteria for the identification of able students and this is used directly to inform teachers’ planning. The learning needs of able students are clearly addressed in schemes of work and short-term plans. They are expressed in carefully differentiated learning objectives and intended learning outcomes.

Teaching explicitly builds on prior skills, knowledge and understanding of able students to ensure appropriate progression that promote independent learning.

Help and support

The faculty runs an open door policy for all students to be able to talk about their progress and make arrangements for extra tuition with individual staff. Students regularly attend classes that are laid on for them both after school and  during some of the school holidays.

Outline

Here is an outline of what we expect to cover with the students. It is possible that some groups will cover the material at different paces as we want the students to have a good understanding before moving on.

Years 7 and 8 are considered as Key Stage 3.

GCSE courses start when students enter year 9 and 10 .

Curriculum Design Technology

Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Range of Materials and Their General, Physical, Aesthetic and Structural Characteristics

Students should be able to:

·       demonstrate an effective working knowledge of materials in relation to their categories and the manufacture of technological products:

Discuss and consider a variety of products made from a range of materials; identify and justify the materials used in terms of their physical, aesthetic and structural characteristics.

Projects.


Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Tools, Processes and Techniques

Students should be able to:

·       demonstrate an effective working knowledge of how processes and techniques are used with materials to manufacture technological products;

·       demonstrate an understanding of the main features and applications of hand tools:

Manufacture various products using
a range of materials, tools, machines and processes.

Plan the manufacture of various products.

Identify, list and state the function of the required tools, machines and equipment for each product.

Manufacture a range of products
using the appropriate tools,
machines and equipment.


Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Tools, Processes and Techniques

Students should be able to:

·       demonstrate an understanding of the main features and applications of machine tools:

·       demonstrate an understanding of joining methods

Identify the appropriate permanent joining method to a variety of given projects.

Sketch various joining techniques.

Appropriate Methods of Joining

   

Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Production Methods

Students should be able to:

·       demonstrate an effective working knowledge of production methods:

Produce a report on production methods:

Moulds and Jigs

·       demonstrate an understanding of how moulds and jigs are used for the vacuum forming and line bending of thermoplastic sheets.

Analyse a range of products suggesting suitable manufacturing systems.

Sketch a range of jigs and moulds used in vacuum forming and line bending.

CAM and CAD

·       demonstrate an understanding of the process of computer aided manufacture (CAM):

Produce a range of CAD drawings – both pictorial and working drawings including assemblies up to five parts using a suitable package, e.g. Solidworks.

Produce a report on a visit to a company with CAD/CNC facilities.


Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Finishing Techniques

Students should be able to:

·       demonstrate an effective working knowledge of suitable finishing techniques for materials, taking  account of their function, aesthetics and environment:

Analyse and identify the appropriate finish for a variety of products with the use of various materials.

Material Efficiency

·       reduce material wastage during manufacture, thereby maximising the use of materials to reduce cost.

 

Designers

·       analyse the work of other designers; and

·       discuss how other designers have researched, prepared specifications, developed ideas and reached a final outcome.

Discuss and analyse examples of products; their research, development and final design.


Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Emerging Technologies

Students should be able to:

·       demonstrate an understanding of developments in new technologies, with specific reference to nanotechnology and its everyday applications:

Research and discuss the emerging technologies.

Health and Safety

·       recognise common health and safety symbols and the use of appropriate personal protective equipment;

·       recognise the importance of safety when using workshop tools, equipment, machines and components; and

·       recognise potential hazards in products, activities and environments.

Identify health and safety signs used in the workshop.

Identify safe procedures and practice.

3.1.2 Electronics

Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Construction Techniques

Students should be able to:

·       identify the tools and equipment required to produce a reliable, functioning technological product; and

·       select appropriate modelling and construction methods to assemble electronic circuits.

Name and give the use of a range
of tools and equipment for the appropriate function.

Students should be familiar with a
wide range of specialist tools and equipment through the course
of their design and make activities.

Input–Process–Output

·       demonstrate an understanding that electronic systems may contain input–process–output.

Model circuit designs.

Investigate various systems

Units and Measurements

·       apply an understanding of electrical units to measure current, voltage and resistance.

Test and measure modelled circuits.


Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Components

Students should be able to:

·       identify components by their circuit symbols and physical appearance:

–    batteries

·       select appropriate components to meet the requirements of a circuit diagram.

Familiarise students with symbols
and give the use for the electronic components.

Draw a range of circuit diagrams.


Specification Content

Learning Outcomes

Teaching and Learning
Activities

Conductors and Insulators

Students should be able to:

·       demonstrate knowledge of the use of conductors and insulators;

Explain the differences between conductors and insulators.

Resistors

·       use the colour coding system to identify values of individual resistors; and

·       calculate the resistance of two or more resistors in series, using:

·       Rt = R1 + R2 + Rn.

Identify the colour coding of resistors.

Calculate the resistors in series.

Practice past examination style questions.

Switching

·       demonstrate an understanding of types of switch:

·       demonstrate an understanding of the action of these switches by recognising and selecting according to application.

Draw the electronic symbols and name the range of switches from their physical appearance.


Specification Content

Learning Outcomes

Teaching and Learning
Activities

Potential Dividers

Students should be able to:

·       use a potential divider to control voltage in a circuit.

Model or make electronic circuit designs with potential dividers, LEDs in series and parallel.

LEDs

·       use LEDs in circuits; and

·       demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the use of current-limiting resistors to protect LEDs (no calculation required).

 
 

3.1.3 Mechanical Control Systems

Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Input–Process–Output

Students should be able to:

·       analyse and describe mechanisms in terms of input–process–output.

Identify and analyse using various examples of mechanical systems
their input, process and output.

Construction Techniques

·       build working models and products using resistant materials and discrete components.

Construct mechanical working
models and/or products,
e.g. cam toys, a car with gears.

Types of Motion

·       recognise and give examples of types of motion:

Identify and give examples of the types of motion.


Topic

Outline

Areas covered

Components

Students should be able to:

·       identify components by their physical appearance and symbols:

Draw the mechanical symbols and
name the range of components
from their physical appearance.

Levers

·       explain the practical applications and uses of first, second and third class levers.

Identify and give examples of the types of levers.


Specification Content

Learning Outcomes

Teaching and Learning
Activities

Cams and Followers

Students should be able to:

·       understand plate cams (limited to eccentric, pear and heart); and

·       understand cam followers (limited to knife, roller and flat).

Draw, identify uses and name the range of cams and followers.

Safety

·       show an awareness of the need for precautions when dealing with moving parts.

Make card models of cams and followers.

Input–Process-Output Proprietary Interface

·       show that computer control systems may contain input–process–output.

·       know the importance of the interface as a protection and connection device.

Identify and analyse, using various examples of computer control systems, their input, process and output.

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize

3.1.4 Computer Control Systems

Topic

Outline

Areas covered

The Function and Application of Flow Charts and Symbol Recognition

Students should be able to:

·       demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the use of flow charts and draw flow chart diagrams to describe a sequence of events.

Explain the use and need for interface devices for computer systems.

Model a range of computer control events.

Describe the use and identify the sequence of events.

Programmable Control

·       apply knowledge and understanding of appropriate software to construct programmes which contain:

–    loops;
–    time delay;
–    decisions; and
–    increment/decrement.

Model a range of computer control programmes.