2014-15

What is Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium is a grant from the government to help disadvantaged young people do well at school.  The funding is allocated to schools for children from Reception to Year 11 who have registered for free school meals in the last six years, are in care or have parents in the Armed Forces.

Report last updated December 2014

At the Gateway Academy we have used the additional funding provided through the Pupil Premium scheme [PP] in a variety of ways, with groups of targeted students to ensure that those supported by the grant are making accellerated progress and that gaps in students’ progress and attainment are closing.  Whilst many of the activities are targeted specifically towards students who are entitled to PP, the Gateway Academy operates an open-access policy where ever possible. The progress in attainment can be seen in the Principal’s Report to the Local Governing Body and the CEO’s Report to the Board of Directors.

Headline data from the current self-evaluation form relating to students entitled to the Pupil Premium

  • Ofsted Framework: For pupils for whom the pupil premium provides support, the proportions making expected progress are similar to, or above, those for other pupils in the school or are improving.

Pupil Premium Progress Predictions for the End of Key Stage 4 

[Current Year 11: 2010-15]

English

3 levels progress

 4 levels progress

All

PP

Non PP

SEND

All

PP

Non PP

SEND

2015

83%

80%

85%

58%

29%

24%

35%

14%

2014

68%

59%

74%

50%

25%

20%

27%

18%

2013

61%

52%

68%

46%

27%

18%

34%

 

2012

70%

63%

78%

45%

12%

 

 

 

Maths

3 levels progress

 4 levels progress

All

PP

Non PP

SEND

All

PP

Non PP

SEND

2015

71%

63%

77%

30%

25%

21%

28%

14%

2014

65%

49%

75%

35%

20%

14%

24%

7%

2013

71%

63%

78%

36%

31%

19%

41%

 

2012

75%

70%

80%

59%

35%

 

 

 

2012

75%

70%

80%

59%

35%

 

 

 

Data for English shows that 83% of Year 11 students entitled to Pupil Premium will make expected progress compared with 90% of those not entitled [a difference of -7%]. 

In Maths, data shows 72% of Year 11 students entitled to Pupil Premium will make expected progress in Maths compared with 80% of those not entitled [a difference of -8%]. This represents a significant improvement from 2013 when 49% of students made expected progress [an improvement of 23%].

  • Ofsted Framework: The achievement of pupils for whom the pupil premium provides support at least matches that of other pupils in the school or is rising, including in English and mathematics.

Pupil Premium Predicted Attainment Current Year 11 [2010-2015]

 

L4+ Attainment on entry

Attainment Gap

Year 11 Predicted GCSE A*-C

Attainment Gap

Gap Closed

Attainment gap

L4+ on entry

Non PP

PP

+ / -

Non PP

PP

+ / -

+ / -

English

75%

49%

-26%

78

55

-23

+3

Maths

72%

51%

-21%

    79

49

-30

-9

E&M

63%

33%

-30%

71

44

-27

+3

This table demonstrates that students entitled to the Pupil Premium have made better progress from when they entered the Academy in English and mathematics and English combined but not in mathematics.

Pupil Premium Year 11 Attainment Outcomes [2009-2014]

 

L4+ Attainment on entry

Attainment Gap

Year 11 Predicted GCSE A*-C

Attainment Gap

Gap Closed

Attainment gap

L4+ on entry

Non PP

PP

+ / -

Non PP

PP

+ / -

+ / -

English

76%

45%

-31%

70

49

21

+ 10%

Maths

71%

34%

-37%

67

40

27

+ 10%

E&M

71%

42%

-39%

59

36

23

+ 16%

This table demonstrates that students entitled to the Pupil Premium made better progress from when they entered the Academy in English, mathematics as well as English and mathematics combined.

The activities and resource allocations are as follows:

Funding Focus

Output/Impact

Cost

1.      The part funding of an Educational Welfare Officer  to address the poor attendance of ‘hard to reach’ pupils and to work with other students to address barriers to learning.

The EWO is working with Academy pastoral staff to:

  • Establish policies and systems that will encourage good attendance;
  • Lead the team of attendance ambassadors;
  • Prepare the papers when prosecutions are necessary;
  • Maintain a case-load of up to 20 targeted families to secure improved attendance
  • 6 families have now been through or are in the process of prosecution  and this has had an impact on many families, ensuring their chidren’s attendance improves to avoid this consequence.

 

Actual

2012-13

Actual

2013-14

Target

2014-15

Current

(as end of October 14)

 

Non-PP

PP

Attendance

92.6

93.7

94

94

91.9

Persistent Absence

10.3

6.5

<6

NA

NA

 

28,000

2.      The part funding for  Attendance Ambassadors who work in the community visiting homes of targetted students whose attendance is below the academy’s target.

  • As at the end of October 2014, 132 documented visits were made to GA families during the academic year. Of these 113 visits were to those entitled to Pupil Premium.
  • This work is part of the targeted approach that is having a positive impact on overall attendance and a reduction in the level of PA across the Academy. Parents are now aware that they are likely to receive a visit to talk about their child’s absence.
  • Visits are helping to reinforce the GLC policy that illness will not be authorised unless it is accompanied by a medical certificate.

4,500

3.      The continuing funding of an Inclusion Leader who will provide targeted support to ensure the well-being of FSM [and other students] and to ensure that they are ready to access learning in the classroom.

  • The Inclusion Leader works with students and their parents to reduce any existing barriers to learning.  The Inclusion Leader has a particular focus on students that are entitled to the Pupil Premium, paying attention to their academic progress as well as their emotional developmnet.
  • The Inclusion Leader sign-posts students and families to specialist services and links with these to ensure all relevant information is communicated between the acencies involved.

35,000

4.      3 additional qualified intervention teachers are employed in Maths and Science to create smaller classes at Key Stage 4 and to staff a wide range of intervention groups for students of all ages.  Additional capacity has also been created in English to provide additional opportunities for interventions.

 

 

% of Y11 students making expected progress

% of  Y11 PPG making expected progress

 

% of  Y11 Non-PPG making expected progress

 

Difference in the performance of PPG students and Non PPG students

English

83

80

85

-5

Maths

71

63

78

-14

Figures accurate as of November 2014

120,000

5.      To provide a one week Summer School and  Saturday Summer School targeted at PP students [but open to all] to ensure an effective transition to Year 7.

  • 44 students entitled to PP attended the 2014 Summer School.
  • 21 students entitled to PP attended the Saturday Sessions throughout June and July.
  • The feedback has been 100% positive showing that students who take part in transition activities are more confident when they start Year 7.

15,000

6.      To provide a primary trained teacher to deliver a tailored curriculum [focussing on literacy and numeracy] for students functioning below L3c on entry to the Academy.

  • To date, 8 students have accessed this provision.

 

% predicted to make expected progress by the end of Y7

% predicted to make better than expected progress by the end of Y7

English

80

40

Maths

80

40

 

30,000

7.      To provide targeted support for targeted Key Stage 3, 4 and 5 students [and some Key Stage 2].

To provide targeted support and early intervention through the Academy’s previous Connexions Advisor, for vulnerable students to maintain them in full-time education and to support their progression to post-16 opportunities. 

In 2007, 20% of the academy’s students were NEET [not in Education, Employment or Training] at the end of Year 11.  By 2014, this has fallen to 0%.

27,000

8.      To provide additional support for students who have English as an additional language through an EAL specialist teacher.

  • Students will receive intensive one-one and small group intervention to ensure that they make accelerated progress in English thus allowing them to access the wider curriculum

8,500

9.      To provide counselling services for those targeted students who are unable to operate effectively in the classroom setting for a wide variety of reasons.

  • 21 pupils from Key Stages 3 & 4 have accessed the counselling courses throughout the year [18 are PP students]
  • 19 students have shown improvements in the levels/grades in three or more of their subjects since accessing the counselling.

6,900

10.   An Outreach Worker has been employed to work directly with students and their families to address what are often complex barriers to attendance and learning.

The Outreach Worker [OW] has worked with 14 families to date [November 2014]

  • She works with a case-load of 12 families at any one time.
  • 50% of the students have made improvements to their attendance and attitudes to school.
  • 30% have shown improvements in level/grades in three or more subject areas.
  • The OW has also supported families and signposted them to relevant services where the parents have not known in which direction to turn for support.
  • The OW has also supported a number of students to become involved in positive activities within the Academy and in the wider community. 
  • The OW has completed one parent support group to date with 100% of all those attending, completing the course.

33,123

11.   Deep Learning Day Trip Funding.

  • There are 11 Deep Learning Days during the course of the academic year.  Funding has been made available to widen the range of trips and activities that will be possible and will support the Academy’s strategy to raise the aspirations.

12,000

12.   After school support.

  • Targeted students are invited to attend focussed after-school sessions in subjects where they are below their target grade.
  • Targeted students also received additional support to finish or improve their coursework at weekends and during school holidays.

6,000

13.   Contingency to fund support that is identified during the course of the year.

  • A wide range of interventions and activities will be organised during the course of the year to support the progress of targeted students.

25,000

14.   Off site ‘turnaround’ provision.

  • This provides tailored 1-1 support for students who find it difficult to function in a mainstream setting. Interventions and on-going support aims to help students to be successfully reintegrated into the classroom.
  • To date, 11 students entitled to PP have been referred to the turnaround service to improve the areas where they have difficulty in school.

45,000

15.   Alternative Education.

  • On site alternative education is being provided this year for a small number of students for whom a ‘mainstream’ curriculum has been unsuccessful.   The aim of this provision is to develop the students’ vocational skills and accelerate their English and maths skills which are typically behind expectations.

50,000

 

Total

446,023